Power Supply Cable Guide [Complete Details]

Do you know what the most frustrating part of building a PC is? No, it’s not figuring out which components are compatible with each other. It’s not even finding the right drivers for your new hardware. It’s connecting the power supply cables! There are so many different cables, and they all seem to be different sizes and shapes. But don’t worry, we’re here to help. Just follow these four easy steps and you’ll have your power supply cable connected in no time!

How to Connect Your Power Supply Cable

  1. Start by finding the right power supply for your needs. If you’re not sure, just ask one of our friendly sales associates and they’ll be happy to help you out.
  2. Once you’ve got the right power supply, it’s time to start connecting the cables. The first thing you’ll need to do is connect the 24-pin ATX cable to the motherboard. This is usually located near the edge of the board, and it should be labeled “ATX 24.” If you can’t find it, consult your motherboard’s manual.
  3. Next, you’ll need to connect the 4+4 pin CPU power cable to the socket on the motherboard labeled “CPU_PWR.” Again, if you can’t find it, consult your motherboard’s manual.
  4. Finally, connect the PCIe power cables to any graphics cards that you may have installed. These are usually located at the top of the card, and they should be labeled “PCIe.” That’s it! Now all you need to do is plug in your power supply and flip the switch on the back. Congratulations, you’ve successfully connected your power supply cable!

Power Supply Cable Connector Names and Functions

  • 24-pin ATX Main Power Cable – This cable provides power to the motherboard and all its components. It is usually the thickest cable in the power supply unit (PSU).
  • 4+4-pin EPS/ATX12V Power Cable – This cable provides power to the CPU. It is usually a thinner cable than the 24-pin ATX power cable.
  • 6+2-pin PCIe Power Cable – This cable provides power to PCI Express (PCIe) devices, such as graphics cards. It is usually a thin and flexible cable.
  • SATA Power Cable – This cable provides power to SATA devices, such as hard drives and optical drives. It is usually a thin and flexible cable.
  • 4-pin Molex Power Cable – This cable provides power to older devices that use the 4-pin Molex connector. It is usually a thicker and less flexible cable.

Now that you know the different types of power supply cables, let’s move on to connecting them…

1. 24-pin ATX Main Power Cable

The 24-pin ATX main power cable is the most important cable in the PSU. It provides power to the motherboard and all its components. To connect it, simply align the connector with the header on the motherboard and push it in until it clicks into place.

2. 4+4-pin EPS/ATX12V Power Cable

The 4+4-pin EPS/ATX12V power cable is used to provide power to the CPU. To connect it, simply align the connector with the header on the motherboard and push it in until it clicks into place.

3. 6+2-pin PCIe Power Cable

The 6+2-pin PCIe power cable is used to provide power to PCI Express (PCIe) devices, such as graphics cards. To connect it, simply align the connector with the header on the device and push it in until it clicks into place.

4. SATA Power Cable

The SATA power cable is used to provide power to SATA devices, such as hard drives and optical drives. To connect it, simply align the connector with the header on the device and push it in until it clicks into place.

5. 4-pin Molex Power Cable

The 4-pin Molex power cable is used to provide power to older devices that use the 4-pin Molex connector. To connect it, simply align the connector with the header on the device and push it in until it clicks into place.

Once all the cables are connected, you can close up the case and turn on your computer. If everything goes well, it should boot up without any problems. If you have any questions, please feel free to leave a comment below and I’ll try to help you out.

Conclusion

Connecting a power supply cable may seem like a daunting task, but it’s really not that difficult once you know what you’re doing. Just follow these four easy steps and you’ll have it done in no time! If you’re still having trouble, our friendly sales associates are always happy to help out. And don’t forget to check your motherboard’s manual if you can’t find something; it’s usually a big help. Good luck!

Matt Hanson
Matt Hanson is a technology journalist and author at TechRadar. He is also working as an author on TechyDesktop. He loves to write about tech, computers, and PCs.